Monday, April 15, 2013

Dependent Prepositions

Saturday, November 06, 2010

GERUNDS AND INFINITIVES

tutorial+ exercises

tutorial+ exercises

Exercises

verbs followed by gerunds

verbs followed by infinitives

Verbs Followed by Nouns + Infinitives

Verbs Followed by Either Gerunds OR Nouns + Infinitives

gerunds after possessives

List of prepositions

part 1+ exercises

part 2+exercises


part 3+exercises

Extra Practice

Thursday, September 30, 2010

NEW PAGES TO PRACTICE FOR THE FCE

USE OF ENGLISH


ALL THE AREAS ONLINE


ONLINE EVALUATION


MANY EXERCISES TO CHOOSE FROM

Thursday, September 02, 2010

FCE - CAE



FCE PRACTICE ONLINE
FCE PRACTICE ONLINE 2
FCE PRACTICE ONLINE 3
FCE PRACTICE ONLINE 4



CAE ONLINE PRACTICE 1
CAE ONLINE PRACTICE 2

Monday, November 30, 2009

The Subjunctive

Learn and practice in the following pages. Very important topic for the Ecce

Learn
Learn and practice

INVERSION WITH NEGATIVE ADVERBIALS + SO/SUCH

Inversion refers to an irregular verb placement form:

Use of Question Form

In this case, the question form (auxiliary + subject + main verb) takes the place of the standard positive sentence structure (i.e. He goes to work every day):

Examples

Not only do I enjoy classical music, but I also have a season ticket to the symphony.
Seldom has the boss been so upset!

In this case, the question form is substituted for standard sentence structure in a statement. Generally, an inversion is used to stress the uniqueness of an event and begins with a negative.

Negative Adverbials

Time expressions: never, rarely, seldom

These time expressions are used with a perfect form or with modals and often include comparatives:

Examples

Never have I been more insulted!
Seldom has he seen anything stranger.

Time expressions: hardly, barely, no sooner, or scarcely

These time expressions are used when a there are a succession of events in the past.

Examples

Scarcely had I got out of bed when the doorbell rang.
No sooner had he finished dinner, when she walked in the door.

After 'Only' Expressions such as 'only after', 'only when', 'only then', etc.

'Only' is used with a time expression.

Examples

Only then did I understand the problem.
Only after understanding the situation does the teacher make a comment.

After 'Little'

'Little' is used in a negative sense.

Examples

Little did he understand the situation.
Little have I read concerning nanotechnology.

Inversion after 'So', 'Such', and 'That'

'So'

'So + adjective ... that' combines with the verb 'to be'.

Examples

So strange was the situation that I couldn't sleep.
So difficult is the test that students need three months to prepare.

'Such'

'So + to be + noun ... (that)':

Examples

Such is the moment that all greats traverse.
Such is the stuff of dreams.

Inverted Conditional Forms

Sometimes conditional forms are inverted as a means of sounding more formal. In this case, the conditional 'if' is dropped and the inverted forms takes the place of the 'if clause'.

Examples

Had he understood the problem, he wouldn't have committed those mistakes.
Should he decide to come, please telephone.

(Source: http://esl.about.com)


1- HARDLY, SCARCELY, BARELY, NO SOONER
2- NEVER, RARELY, IN / UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES, IN NO WAY, NOT ONLY ... BUT ALSO, LITTLE etc.
3- ONLY AFTER, ONLY IF, ONLY IN THIS WAY etc., NOT UNTIL




NEGATIVE AND LIMITING ADVERBIALS

Practice
Learn

EXERCISE :)


For each of the following sentences, add the negative expression shown in brackets at the beginning of the sentence, and make any other changes that are necessary. For example:
I had reached home when I remembered the message. (hardly)
Hardly had I reached home when I remembered the message.

We had the opportunity to do whatever we wanted. (seldom)
Seldom did we have the opportunity to do whatever we wanted.

1. We had entered the room when the telephone rang. (scarcely)
2. I have seen a more beautiful ballet than that one. (never)
3. We realized that a dangerous stretch of road lay ahead of us. (little)
4. I have worked as hard as I could. (never before)
5. A writer can express his exact feelings in words. (rarely)
6. We perceive everything that is around us. (hardly ever)
7. One can find a more striking example of erosion than the Grand Canyon. (nowhere)
8. They guessed what was about to happen. (little)
9. I am entirely satisfied with my situation. (seldom)
10. One comprehends a complex situation immediately. (rarely)



Answers

*

CAUSATIVE VERBS

(Click on the picture to enlarge)



The causative is a common structure in English. It is used when one thing or person causes another thing or person to do something. This page will explain how causatives are formed, and how to use them.

(Source: See original page!!!!!!)




Let/Make/Have/Get Tutorial
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Monday, November 09, 2009

CONDITIONALS MEGA POST

Conditional sentences: Videos







Study about conditionals here :)
Lesson
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Lesson
And now, let's practice!!

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GAME WITH SONG!!!
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Complete, print, and bring it to class :)

ENJOY!!

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

USED TO and WOULD

When we are telling a story and recollecting an event from long ago, we often prefer to use would to describe repeated behavior in the past, although both would and used to are possible.

Note that would describes past events and actions. It cannot be used to refer to past states. To describe past states we can only use used to:

Used to
can be used for repeated/habitual actions AND states.
Would can only be used to talk about repeated/habitual actions in the past.

State verbs generally fall into 4 groups and you can't use "Would" to refer a past habit in the past. Use Used to with these verbs!!

Emotion: love, hate, want, need

Possession: have, own, want, belong

Senses: see, hear, smell, seem

Thought: know, believe, remember



Used To
Would (always/never)
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Used to Video
Used to/Would Video
Song

Wishful statements




The word wish is similar in meaning to the expression "would like":

I wish I had a big house = I would like to have a big house. (My house now is small)
I wish I had been there = I would like to have been there.(but I wasn't there)
I wish you would stop talking = I would like you to stop talking.
I wish to see the manager = I would like to see the manager.
I wish you a Merry Christmas = I would like you to have a Merry Christmas.

Its main use is to express regret that things are not different. It is possible to use wish in this way to talk about both the present/future and the past:

I wish (that) I weren't here now.(I'd like to be somewhere else!)
I wish (that) I didn't have to go to school tomorrow.(...but I have to)
I wish (that) I had studied harder when I was at school.(I didn't study enough)

Notice that the verb tenses that follow wish are the same as those used in the second and third conditionals (see Grammar definitions).

Also notice the word that can be omitted in more informal speech.

The expression wishwould is used to talk about (lack of) willingness to do things:

I wish you would tidy your room.(becasue your room is a mess)
I wish you wouldn't always come home so late. (you never come on time

In a formal style, wish + (object) + infinitive can be used in the same way as "want":

I wish to speak to the director.
Do you wish me to serve refreshments, sir?
Wish is also used in some fixed expressions:
I/we wish you a Merry Christmas (and a Happy New Year).
I/we wish you well/all the best.

(sources: http://www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish-central-grammar-wish.htm)

WISH

WISH CHART

EXERCISES

Ex 1
Ex 2 (Game)
Ex 3
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Ex 5
Ex 6
Music Video



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